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79: “We End Up In Bed Together” – The X-Files Part 2

Last time on the podcast, we shared our own histories with the X-Files from back When We Were Young – so listen to Episode 78 for Part 1 of this conversation. Here in the second installment, we talk about some of the most impactful and fan-favorite episodes from the course of the show, as well as the X-Files Movie: Fight The Future – and we discuss the cultural impact of The X-Files and its online fan community.

Do we get drawn deeply into the mythology arc where Mulder and Scully seek to uncover the truth about extraterrestrial life? Do we think David Duchovny can actually act? And in the inevitable Buffy vs X-Files showdown, can any of us truly win?

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

78: “Nobody Down Here But The FBI’s Most Unwanted” – The X-Files

The Truth Is Out There… but so are lies. And so are two extremely beautiful FBI agents. And so is a Fluke Man who lives in the sewer, but also hides out in Porta-Potties! The WHEN WE WERE YOUNG podcast continues our Quarantine Indoor Summer Slam by revisiting Chris Carter’s THE X-FILES, the long-running smash hit Fox TV drama starring Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny as FBI Agents Dana Scully and Fox Mulder, respectively. In this first X-amination, we uncover the shocking truth about each of our hosts’ pasts with the X-Files, our love for the lead actors, the history of the series and its creator Chris Carter, and we rewatch the pilot.

The X-Files brought spooky atmospherics and an hour of stories of little green men, government conspiracies, and sometimes-silly-sometimes-terrifying “monsters of the week” to primetime TV audiences throughout the 90s. And it made science fiction horror into unexpected ratings and Emmys gold for many years of its original 9-season run. Beyond just Nielsen ratings and statuettes, The X-Files deeply influenced TV drama itself and built a new template for “procedural” television dramas emulated by countless shows today.

Delight as our hosts uncover the mysteries of which of us actually watched the X-Files first – it’s not who you think! Find out which of our hosts lives on a rolling platform under his bed – it’s probably exactly who you think! So much is revealed – and there is STILL so much left to uncover! Tune back in a few days from now when we upload the second episode of our invXtigation, covering all the most important and fan-who-is-Seth-favorite episodes of the series.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

54: “…And I’m All Out Of Bubblegum” – 80s Dystopias Part 2

The 1980s may not have been quite as bleak as 1984 predicted, but the Reagan era did see plenty of doom and gloom in entertainment, from Mad Max and Blade Runner to The Terminator and RoboCop. In When We Were Young’s latest episodes, Reel Gents podcast host Travis Dukelow joins us to dissect a cornucopia of dystopias unleashed in the 80s.

In Part One, we cover Terry Gilliam’s legendary BRAZIL (1985), which takes several cues from Orwell’s 1984 and adds a healthy dollop of dryly absurd British humor. Jonathan Pryce stars as meek cog-in-the-machine Sam Lowry, whose heroic fantasies offer the only hope of escape from a dreary, duct-ravaged world — at least, until Robert De Niro shows up as the world’s most swashbuckling repairman. If your vision of the future involves Christmastime, lobotomies, plastic surgery gone awry, and terrorism, this is the dystopia for you!

If you prefer a more scathing satire of consumerism and media, however, look no further than John Carpenter’s camp classic THEY LIVE (1987), discussed in Part Two of this episode. It stars wrestler Roddy Piper as John Nada, a down-on-his-luck drifter who suddenly learns that roughly half of America’s population is being brainwashed by television — and the other half are aliens. This cult favorite features magic sunglasses, excessive ass-kicking, and absolutely no bubblegum — and yet feels strangely prescient about the state of the world in 2018.

Is it 1984 yet? Join us for this two-part dystopic extravaganza before the inevitable collapse of society renders podcasts obsolete!

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. You can follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and you can email us your episodes suggestions at wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung.

43: “Prepare the World for Bad News” – Deep Impact & Armageddon

Grab some tissues, because in our latest episode, we’re sharing the movies that made us cry when we were young!

In the summer of 1998, two blockbusters hurtled into theaters with virtually the same premise: astronauts blasting up into space to blow up deadly space rocks with nuclear weapons. In many ways, these twin disaster flicks couldn’t be more different. DEEP IMPACT has Tea Leoni, Elijah Wood, and a comet, focusing on journalism and science. ARMAGEDDON stars Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton, and an asteroid, concerning loudmouth white male oil drillers with minimal education or training. (Bet you can’t guess which one Michael Bay directed!)

In 2018, these doomsday vehicles turn out to be surprisingly relevant in terms of current politics, but how do they hold up as mindless special effects-driven entertainment? When We Were Young discusses America’s actual first black president Morgan Freeman, plus child marriage, daddy issues galore, and the efficacy of Ben Affleck’s animal cracker seduction. You won’t want to miss a thing!

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. You can follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and you can email us your episodes suggestions at wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung.

The Voting Rights Act and DOMA are Dead, and John Lewis is Alive

At the end of a resounding and thunderous two days for this country, I am reminded of a speech given in 1996 by civil rights hero and Congressman John Lewis. He helped form the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and was one of the Freedom Riders who publicly and peacefully defied segregation, and he was nearly beaten to death by racist assholes trying to keep Jim Crow in US law now and forever in the 1950s and 60s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selma_to_Montgomery_marches).

But he didn’t stop fighting for basic freedom after the Voting Rights Act (which he lived to see the US Supreme Court murder) and Civil Rights Act were signed, or after he became a Congressman in the 80s. In the 1990s when Democrats nationwide were running to the right (most have never run back), John Lewis saw exactly what the “Defense of Marriage Act” was and nailed it to the fucking wall before it ever got voted out of Congress, before it was ever signed into American law by that self-serving corporate toady masquerading as an elder statesman Bill Clinton.

In case you ever need help divining or recalibrating your moral orientation, John Lewis’s compass tends to point true north.*

“Why do you not want your fellow men and women, your fellow Americans to be happy? Why do you attack them? Why do you want to destroy the love they hold in their hearts? Why do you want to crush their hopes, their dreams, their longings, their aspirations? We are talking about human beings, people like you, people who want to get married, buy a house, and spend their lives with the one they love. They have done no wrong.

I will not turn my back on another American. I will not oppress my fellow human being. I have fought too hard and too long against discrimination based on race and color not to stand up against discrimination based on sexual orientation. Mr. Chairman, I have known racism. I have known bigotry. This bill stinks of the same fear, hatred and intolerance. It should not be called the Defense of Marriage Act. It should be called the defense of mean-spirited bigots act.”

Two end notes and that asterisk:

*Except, unfortunately, he did the 09/2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force that launched America’s Forever War against a tactic… only one Congressman, California’s Barbara Lee, was brave enough to vote against the AUMF.

1) Watch this video clip of most of John Lewis’s 1996 DOMA soliloquy here and remain completely unmoved. I dare ya. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MorAz0WqR9c

2) From his Wikipedia page: “John Lewis opposed the U.S. waging of the 1991 Gulf War, NAFTA, and the 2000 trade agreement with China that passed the House. Lewis opposed the Clinton administration on NAFTA and welfare reform. After welfare reform passed, Lewis was described as outraged; he said, ‘Where is the sense of decency? What does it profit a great nation to conquer the world, only to lose its soul?'”