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88: “I Don’t Need You Anymore” – #1 Pop Singles Of The 90s

We came away from our musical journey through the #1 Pop Singles of the 1980s loving many of the biggest hits of the decade. Good job, 80s! The 90s? Well, that’s another story.

We’ve already discussed some of the decade’s biggest breakouts on the podcast, including No Doubt, Alanis Morissette, Spice Girls, and Nirvana, all of whom got to #1 on our own personal charts at one point in time. But the #1 Pop Singles of the 1990s are a much more scattered affair, veering from upbeat pop cheese to gangsta rap to disco-dance throwbacks, with a whole lot of “adult contemporary” in the mix.

As it turns out, the Billboard charts of the 90s watched America go through a diverse range of musical moods, from mourning the death of British royals to celebrating barely-contained boners on the dance floor — plus a lot more Costner worship than should be permitted in one decade. Of course, the mid 90s also saw a Latin-flavored dance craze that’s not just a #1 Pop Single, but also the #1 Most Cringe-Worthy Aspect of the whole decade! (Maybe even the entire 20th century!)

So which songs do we want to “Hold On” to, and which have reached the “End of the Road?” Be forewarned — just because these songs were #1 does NOT mean we will always love them.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

87: “Let Me Hear Your Body Talk” – #1 Pop Singles Of The 80s

In the days before YouTube and Spotify, most people discovered new music through a little device called the radio, and tracking the popularity of hit songs was much simpler. Back in the 80s, Billboard determined which songs charted through sales of physical singles on cassette tapes or CDs, and of course, airplay on the radio — which is how singles by artists like Blondie and Prince became inescapable at that moment in time.

In this episode, your When We Were Young co-hosts take Billboard’s #1 charting pop single from every year of the 80s out for a spin — and the results are mixed! If “80s music” makes you think of Madonna, Billy Joel, Van Halen, or even A-ha, you’re not alone — but none of these popular artists actually dominated the charts in any given year of the decade. (Believe it or not, neither did the King of Pop himself!)

While some tracks, like 1983’s chart-topper “Every Breath You Take,” are no-brainers, there are a few head-scratchers in the mix, too. The 80s were surprisingly big on ditties about Oscar-winning divas and the gaits of ancient peoples. So put on your best aerobics attire and join us as we whisper carelessly about the #1 Pop Singles of the 1980s —the ones we still have plenty of “Faith” in, those we’re desperate to “Look Away” from, and everything in between.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

60: “Do You Have The Time To Listen To Me Whine?” – 1994 Alternative Music

When Kurt Cobain died in April 1994, the grunge movement expired too, giving way to a broader spectrum of angry, bummed out rock that came to be defined as “alternative” (even though it may very well have been the dominant rock of the mid to late 90s).

A landmark year for music in many ways, 1994 brought debuts, breakouts, and/or essential recordings from bands like Green Day, Stone Temple Pilots, Oasis, Nine Inch Nails, Bush, Hole, Weezer, and The Offspring amongst others. And while many of these artists could easily fill an episode of the podcast all on their own, the fact that so many essential albums were released in a single calendar year made it impossible for us to keep ‘em separated.

Rewind 25 years back to the past to rediscover some of the 90s’ most iconic tracks, from Beck’s “Loser” to Soundgarden’s “Black Hole Sun,” to see which 1994 breakouts have stood the test of time. If you loved alternative music in the 90s, then welcome to paradise!

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung.

56: “She’s So Lucky, She’s A Star” – 1999 Pop Girls

Oh baby, baby, how was the world supposed to know that BRITNEY SPEARS’ 1999 breakout debut ‘Baby… One More Time’ would become one of the best-selling albums of all time, turn the performer into the biggest star on the planet for decades (for better or worse), and usher in new wave of blonde teen pop singers hoping to capture the same success?

In When We Were Young’s latest episode, we head back to 1999 to revisit Britney’s instant domination in pop culture, as well as the debuts of CHRISTINA AGUILERA, MANDY MOORE and JESSICA SIMPSON. Have the last 20 years been kind to these four debut albums? Or do they make us cry, cry, cry in our lonely heart? Join us as we debate the definition of pop music, get disgusted by Joe Simpson’s inappropriate comments about his daughter, and get dirrty discussing the subtext of “Genie in a Bottle.”

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. You can follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and you can email us your episodes suggestions at wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung.

36: “You’re a Lebowski, I’m a Lebowski” – The Big Lebowski

THE BIG LEBOWSKI (1998)

A rug that really tied the room together until it got peed on. A hippie burnout who kept burning. A Vietnam vet who drags everyone else into his world of pain. Add to this a case of mistaken identity, the kidnapping of a trophy wife (in the parlance of our times), and an erotic artist seeking a good and thorough man and you have just *a few* of the characters and plot elements of the woolly and disoriented world of THE BIG LEBOWSKI, the cult favorite 1998 film by the legendary writer-director team of Joel and Ethan Coen.

The Big Lebowski was on every single level the intentional opposite of its Oscar-winning, box office-hit predecessor FARGO (1996), and audiences and critics at the time (like some of our hosts) didn’t abide this strangely hypnotic film. The Coens’ vision of Los Angeles is distinctly un-Hollywood, and it’s filled with anachronistic characters seemingly unstuck in time from the Wild West, the Summer of Love, and the Vietnam War all thrown into the plot of a 1950’s Raymond Chandler detective novel that is playing out in the very early 1990’s. There are so many ins, outs, and what-have-you’s you may need to mix a White Russian and roll a joint just to think it all through.

And in the years since its release, new shit has come to light – and now film audiences of all generations fully embrace and revel in the journey of Jeff Bridges’ stoned drifter The Dude (or His Dudeness, Duder, or El Duderino if you’re not into the whole brevity thing) recovering the few things that keep his universe together – his car, his rug, and his Creedence tapes. Let’s see if our hosts found joy in this movie about bowlers who never actually roll, or if they believe in NOTHING.

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. You can follow us on Twitter at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at @WWWYShow, you can Email us at wwwyshow@gmail.com, and don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes!

You can help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include purchasing movies/shows/music to review, adhering to a pretty strict drug regimen to keep our minds limber, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles CA, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

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