Archives

85: “The Chameleon Strikes In The Dark” – The Thing

Is this a podcast, or is it merely pretending to be? It’s 2020, so we’re celebrating the holidays a little differently this year. We’ve swapped twitching tentacles for twinkling lights, exploding wolfdogs for red-nosed reindeer, lighting killer space beasts aflame for roasting chestnuts, and a creeping existential dread for jolly good cheer. Ho, ho, ho!

The 1980s saw a revival of 50s sci-fi B-movies, with notable remakes offering similarly bizarre chills and thrills with one major upgrade — some of the most stomach-churning special effects ever put to the screen. John Carpenter’s THE THING (1982) is a horror staple now, but it wasn’t so warmly received when it opened for audiences who had just fallen in love with Spielberg’s cuddly alien pal E.T., and Carpenter’s career never fully recovered.

We discuss how late 20th century horror masters took the traditions of drive-in camp classics and made them their own with gross-out gore and cringey body horror, then hunker down and contend with The Thing in all its goopy, arm-chomping glory. Did Carpenter’s classic deserve to be left out in the cold? Or was it a masterpiece merely imitating a box office bomb? Zip up your parka, secure your blood bags, and prepare for a not-so-silent night, because this is one story of immaculate reproduction that isn’t so blessed.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

62: “But It Did Happen” – Magnolia

The year 1999 was a banner year at the cineplex, with dozens of fresh, exciting stories being told by a new crop of auteur filmmakers. Paul Thomas Anderson released his breakthrough movie Boogie Nights two years previous, but it was his epic drama MAGNOLIA (1999) that solidified his place as one of the decade’s most thrilling new directors.

This three-hour ensemble stars basically every actor you love, including Philip Seymour Hoffman as a kind hospice nurse, Julianne Moore as a jittery gold-digger dealing with pangs of guilt, and an Oscar-nominated Tom Cruise as a magnetic pickup artist with a past he’d rather not face. The film was loved by critics upon its release, but how does it hold up 20 years later? Join us as we venture to the San Fernando Valley and discuss our futile attempts to figure out “Magnolia.” And remember to bring your umbrella, because there’s an 82% chance of frogs.

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung.

5: “Welcome to Being Dead” – Don Bluth

secret-of-nimh

Hey, kids! Do you like cartoon mice? Catchy songs? And lots and lots of death? If your answer to these questions is “yep, yep, yep!,” then have we got the podcast for you! In Episode 5, When We Were Young revisits our childhoods through the filmography of Don Bluth, a former Disney animator gone rogue whose lifelong rivalry with the Mouse House makes for one fascinating tale.

an-american-tail-the-mousekewitzes

So let’s reminisce about the forgotten link between VHS tapes and fast food, ponder why so many kiddie flicks revolve around being violently orphaned, and see how old faves like The Secret Of NIMH, An American Tail, Land Before Time, All Dogs Go To Heaven, and Anastasia hold up against Disney’s 80s and 90s offerings. (Hint: the Bluth films have much more poverty and murder.)

the-land-before-time

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, shows, and more hold up now.

all-dogs-go-to-heaven-wide-i

You can follow us on Twitter at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at @WWWYShow, you can Email us at wwwyshow@gmail.com, and don’t forget to subscribe on iTunes!

anastasia_1997_001

You can help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include purchasing movies/shows/etc to review, imbibing enough sedatives to take down an elephant, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio Studio in Los Angeles CA, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung