When We Were Young podcast

124.5 BONUS Mini-Sode: So I Married An Axe Murderer

Here’s a bonus mini-sode where we discuss Mike Myers’ SO I MARRIED AN AXE MURDERER (1993) as well as our own childhood pop cultural touchstones. Join us for the rest of Mike Myers’ epic journey from schwing! to swinger in Part One (Episode 124) of our Saturday Night Leavers – Celluloid Man-Children Of 90s Cinema mini-series!

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

124: “Shall We Shag Now Or Shag Later?” – Mike Myers’ 90s Comedies

Many of the big screen’s most successful comedians got their start on the small screen, and no TV series has launched more comedy all-stars than Saturday Night Live. In 1995, the long-running weekend staple experienced a major shakeup with the exit of many of its most popular cast members, including Adam Sandler, Chris Farley, and Mike Myers – all of whom followed up their successful stints on SNL with feature comedies.

In the first of three episodes focusing on the film careers of these SNL funnymen, we set our sights on Mike Myers, who kicked off the sketch-to-film trend of the 90s by bringing Saturday Night Live’s Wayne Campbell from public access television in Aurora, Illinois to nation-wide box office smash in 1991’s WAYNE’S WORLD. The irreverent comedy co-stars SNL’s Dana Carvey as sidekick Garth and boasts more catchphrases than you could count in a lifetime, but do these wacky slackers have what it takes to party on into the 21st century, or… NOT?

Next up, we thaw out 1997’s AUSTIN POWERS: INTERNATIONAL MAN OF MYSTERY, the outrageous spy spoof starring Myers as a time-hopping 60s swinger who must fight off both his outmoded sexual politics and his maniacal hairless doppelganger, Dr. Evil. The Austin Powers franchise cemented Myers’ status as a major box office drawn and 90s comedy legend, and spawned even more inescapable catchphrases, but is it still groovy, shagadelic, and totally switched on? Or does it make us want to say, “No, baby?”

And in case that isn’t enough to get you all verklempt, our discussion also touches on some of Myers’ beloved SNL characters who didn’t make the transition to the big screen, including Simon, Dieter, and Linda Richman, as well as the Wayne’s World and Austin Powers sequels. Join us on Mike Myers’ epic journey from schwing! to swinger in Part One of our Saturday Night Leavers – Celluloid Man-Children Of 90s Cinema miniseries!

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

123: “We’re Into Barbie!” – Girls’ Toys of the 80s & 90s

We hope you like the color pink, because that’s all you’re getting in this episode! In the second part of our Toys of Summer series, we look back at the most popular toys from our youth that were targeted at little girls – the gentle equines of MY LITTLE PONY, the disturbing, dead-eyed CABBAGE PATCH KIDS, the complicated backstory of JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS, and of course the ubiquitous BARBIE, who first appeared on shelves wearing a black-and-white-striped bathing suit and has since become synonymous with the color pink. 

Mattel has sold billions of Barbie dolls in the last 60 years despite often being the target of controversy; the doll has been a best friend and role model to the little girls who play with her while also contributing to their low self-image. Is there still a place for Barbie today? The inevitable box-office success of Barbie’s first live-action big-screen adaptation might make you say Yes, but when it comes to the dolls, are we as willing to let the next generation of women spend their days imagining themselves as a buxom blonde bombshell?

Join Becky, Chris, and Seth as they explore the gender politics of playing with Barbies, try to make sense of the absurd backstories of Jem and the Holograms and the Cabbage Patch Kids, and compare the stark differences between marketing to boys and girls. 

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

122: “More Than Meets The Eye” – Boys’ Toys of the 80s and 90s

In this “Boys’ Toys” episode of our two-part TOYS OF SUMMER podcast, we revisit icons ranging from Zack the Lego Maniac to Sergeant Slaughter in remembrance of the toys we played with in the 80s and 90s that were marketed primarily to boys.

As it turns out, some of our favorite cartoons from childhood were more than meets the eye – they were advertisements in disguise, created explicitly to get us to buy plastic playthings! The toy-to-TV-show trend kicked off with Hasbro’s relaunch of its G.I. JOE action figures in 1982, rebranded as the “Real American Hero” in a corresponding animated series. It was soon followed by action figure juggernauts HE-MAN AND THE MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE and THE TRANSFORMERS. Using bulging muscles, explosive hardware, and cartoon violence to appeal to young boys, these series often wrapped up with a wholesome life lesson to balance out the mayhem (before cutting to a commercial break encouraging us to buy the latest bazooka-toting action figures).

Along the way, we touch on other toys marketed mainly to boys during this era, including Hot Wheels, Nerf, Tonka Trucks, and Super Soaker – and of course, share thoughts on 1986’s TRANSFORMERS: THE MOVIE and how the death of Optimus Prime traumatized a whole generation of youngsters.

With the fabulous secrets of our favorite toy brands revealed to us, do any of these products still have the power? Or do companies like Hasbro and Mattel just look like Decepticons to us now? With movies like BARBIE and TRANSFORMERS: RISE OF THE BEASTS in theaters this summer, it’s the perfect time to reconsider the lessons we learned from toy-branded cartoons and commercials in the 80s and 90s. Because now we know that the cartoons we loved as kids were a total sham — and knowing is half the battle!

(This episode may contain a choking hazard for children under 3. Becky, Chris, and Seth sold separately.)

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

121: “I Had Bugs For Lunch” – Indiana Jones Part 2

After thoroughly raiding the lost ark in their previous outing, Chris, Becky, and Seth found themselves on shockingly shaky ground with Indiana Jones superfans. Can the three opinionated podcasters escape the wrath of Indy’s admirers this time around?

When We Were Young excavates the further adventures of cinema’s favorite tomb-raiding hunk, digging into Steven Spielberg’s wildly different sequels. First up is 1984’s INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM, which saw Harrison Ford joined by Kate Capshaw and Ke Huy Quan for a disturbing descent into human sacrifice and child slavery. Stuffed with gross-out gags and ultra-macabre special effects, the film outraged parents and alienated critics, but still managed to rake in plenty of that sweet summer movie money and become a staple in many VHS collections. (Thanks in large part to a McDonald’s promotion!)

And finally, we delve into 1989’s INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE, which hewed closer to the adventuresome tone of the 1981 original, with daddy issues added to the mix as Sean Connery came aboard to play Indy’s cranky but lovable father. It was, of course, another gigantic hit, capping off the original film trilogy while paving the way for a TV series, video games, and a super popular Disneyland ride that would hold us over until Dr. Jones’ first return to the big screen nearly two decades later. 

Will When We Were Young rip fans’ still-beating hearts from their chests and crush them with criticism once again? Or will we permit these sequels to sip from the Holy Grail and live on for all eternity?

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

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