When We Were Young podcast

104: “I’m Gonna Get Medieval On Your Ass” – Pulp Fiction

McDonalds, TV pilots, Elvis, and foot massages – just the usual topics of conversation between gangsters, drug users, hitmen, and criminals, at least in Quentin Tarantino’s world. The release of the writer/director’s heavily-lauded PULP FICTION in 1994 was a groundbreaking moment for both Tarantino and movies, and its pop culture-obsessed characters and narrative-jumbling structure influenced the next decade or so of cinema (for better or worse).

Do Pulp Fiction’s accolades remain as bright and shiny as whatever’s in that briefcase? Or are we right in striking down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger? Join us for an expletive-filled adventure back to the ’90s – seriously, make the kiddos cover their ears for this one.

This is Part 2 of our Tarantino-thon! Listen to Part 1 where we revisited NATURAL BORN KILLERS and RESERVOIR DOGS here: https://themfp.org/wwwy-103-naturalbornkillers/

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

103: “The Only Thing That Kills The Demon Is Love” – Natural Born Killers

Hollywood got a double dose of ultraviolence in 1994 with the release of not one but two postmodern, blood-soaked meditations on pop culture and the media from a new and exciting filmmaker named Quentin Tarantino.

The first of these, NATURAL BORN KILLERS, directed by Oliver Stone, was so controversial at the time that Tarantino himself disavowed it (along with a sizeable portion of moviegoers and critics). Nearly 30 years after its release, there’s still a lot to discuss and debate about Mickey and Mallory and whether its satiric and satanic take on the media remains relevant.

There’s also quite a lot to say about the eccentric writer/director’s pre-1994 films TRUE ROMANCE and RESERVOIR DOGS, as well as his influence on ’90s cinema as a whole. That’s why this is just Part 1 of our Tarantino deep-dive—so make sure you tune in for our talk on his arguable (and yes, we do argue) masterpiece PULP FICTION in Part 2!

Follow When We Were Young on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

102: “Reality Is Very Disappointing” – Mannequin & Mannequin On The Move

Sometimes, iconic characters from a movie become pop culture references that outlast and outshine the movie itself. Sometimes, you’d rent a movie at Blockbuster based on the cover alone. And sometimes, ambitious white women in ancient Egypt or “Hauptmann-Koenig” time travel and teleport into beautiful mannequins in a department store in Philly! In 1987 and 1991, that sometimes and those iconic characters were the namesakes of MANNEQUIN and MANNEQUIN TWO: ON THE MOVE.

Whether in the role played by Kim Cattrall in the first outing (playing an Egyptian character – in ancient Egypt) or by Kristy Swanson in the sequel, the female lead of this well-known franchise is a woman hopelessly trapped in a department store window mannequin until a hapless and bumbling (but secretly talented!) handsome guy named Jonathan or Jason arrives to become her instant true love and render the force of life into her immobile body. Cue the instantly-iconic Starship power ballad “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now” and the inevitable wedding bells!

In both movies, Meshach Taylor plays the indefatigable and fabulous Hollywood Montrose, an out and proud gay man who does window displays at the Prince and Company department store and who helps these men meet their mannequin matches. How moving are Mannequin’s representations of women and of “Hollywood” in 2022? Is the Mannequin still vibrant and vivacious – or have time or Egyptian gods or a cursed necklace turned her back into cold, expressionless, painted fiberglass? Also, why don’t more movies Have A Dog? Our podcast hosts surveyed every cranny and corridor of Prince and Company by hang glider to answer those questions and revisit these movies.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts (or wherever you get your podcasts) so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

101: “Would You Please Check My Head For Signs of Spoiling?” – Return To Oz

As we discussed in our 100th episode, L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz delighted generation after generation of children, and MGM’s 1939 musical adaptation became one of the most popular and cherished motion pictures of all time. So it’s only natural that in the ’80s, Disney decided to pay tribute to these Oz classics in a family film that puts Dorothy in an insane asylum and turns her beloved trio of friends to stone… right?

With a surprisingly dark storyline and truly frightening special effects, it’s no wonder 1985’s RETURN TO OZ scared the hell out of more children than it charmed. (Surprise! It wasn’t a hit.) Disney’s pseudo-sequel to a film that everybody knows and loves is largely forgotten, but that doesn’t stop When We Were Young’s hosts from checking back in with the many-headed Princess Mombi, the sinister but fabulous Nome King, and the kooky, cackling Wheelers. Fortunately, young Fairuza Balk and a handful of lovable new comrades, including Tik-Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, and a sassy hen named Billina, are on hand to brighten things up between shudders. 

Is Disney’s dystopian vision of Oz worth the return trip? Or do we wish Dorothy had just followed her own advice and stayed home this time around? Return with us to the scary old land of Oz — if you dare!

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

100: “Bang On My Chest If You Think I’m Perfect” – The Wizard Of Oz

Surrender, Dorothy! For the 100th episode of When We Were Young, Seth, Becky, Chris and returning guest host Jan have clicked their heels together three times and summoned a twister to whisk them all the way back to 1939, when the ultimate Hollywood classic landed on the big screen in glorious Technicolor. Watching THE WIZARD OF OZ has been a childhood rite of passage for several generations now, its characters and quotable dialogue known to just about every man, woman, and child this side of Munchkinland. But does the film itself still have the brains, heart, and nerve to dazzle discerning modern day viewers?

First, Oz aficionado Chris recounts his history with the original fantasy series by L. Frank Baum, which is much more robust than you might think. Then, strap on some sparkly slippers and skip down the yellow brick road with us once again as we revisit the classic film — going gaga over Toto, debating the best and worst tracks from the iconic soundtrack, and marveling at the film’s unforgettable makeup, production design, and special effects. Plus, discover who has the hots for the Tin Man, who thinks the Scarecrow is the ideal life partner, and which hosts think the Cowardly Lion is due for a poaching. (We don’t dodge the tough questions on this podcast.) Repeat after us: there’s no podcast like When We Were Young!

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which include recording remotely, purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

Older Entries